Delivering American University's news and views since 1925. | Thursday, April 26, 2018

Five Track Friday: Tracks to take the edge off the coming cold

MOYAN BRENN, FLICKR

Keep your playlists fresh and your friends impressed with this weekly batch of hand-picked tracks.

1. Bahamas - “All the Time”

(If you like: Delicate Steve, Lord Huron, twangy Afro-pop guitar hooks)

Canadian musician Afie Jurvanen usually errs more on the side of alt-folk (think Blitzen Trapper). While this track off his latest release is certainly a departure, it’s a welcome one. The track’s singular, fuzzy bassline is punctuated by Jurvanen’s falsetto sighs and bright, twangy guitar licks. The whole thing drifts lazily along like the last warm breezes of fall and ends just as abruptly. Too soon, really.

2. The Dig - “Black Water”

(If you like: U.S. Royalty, Cheers Elephant, good ol’ indie-rock)

Like fellow New York indie-rockers The Strokes, The Dig has a certain “band next door” appeal. Sure, they’re no mind-blowing sonic innovators, but you have all winter to hole up inside and soak up some post-rock angst. The Dig’s sunny, no-frills indie-rock is sure to take the edge off those increasingly chilly November winds.

3. King Tuff - “Bad Thing”

(If you like: Dinosaur Jr., Mac DeMarco, the irresistible urge to start an garage band)

King Tuff is part punk, part indie-pop and all awesome. If Johnny Ramone had, in some strange universe, raised a child with J Mascis (of Dinosaur Jr. fame), this is probably what he’d have grown up to be. Oh, and Lou Reed might have been his uncle, or something. Intrigued yet? Just give it a listen, already - preferably with the volume at 11.

4. Francisco The Man - “Tiger”

(If you like: Grouplove, Tame Impala, “native print” anything [you trendster])

Indie-rock is going through one hell of a psychedelic phase right now, which is a breath of fresh air from the claustrophobia of synth-heavy indie-pop. Francisco The Man (not to be confused with Portugal. The Man) balances fuzzed out bass and crashing drums with shoegaze-y, reverb-drenched guitars. Top that off with dual tracked vocals and you’re all set to wander the woods (or, more likely, the Georgetown waterfront) in aural style.

5. Darwin Deez - “DNA”

(If you like: Beck, Born Ruffians, happy music with sad lyrics)

Ok, go look up Darwin Deez. Now tell me that doesn't look like some weird Napoleon/Kip mashup. Darwin Deeze (aka Darwin Smith) is just about as bashful, except he makes excellent music instead of dancing awkwardly to it. “DNA” features his signature alternating monotone/shy falsetto, and one of the coolest guitar tones on the lo-fi scene right now. And the lyrics. Oh, the lyrics. Never has biology been used as such a heartbreaking metaphor for the pain of a freshly failed relationship. “But when I call you are never home, I am down to six or seven chromosomes/But you don’t care or understand, how it feels to be a single double-strand.” Yep, now the winter bleakness can come.


thescene@theeagleonline.com


Comments powered by Disqus