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Comedy from the Truth: Armando Iannucci on the current state of satire and his latest film 'The Death of Stalin'

(03/23/18 6:27pm)

Director and British Statist Armando Iannucci finds himself in a weird predicament. His latest film “The Death of Stalin” has been a sensational critical hit, with The New Yorker magazine heralding it as “the most accurate picture of life under Soviet terror that anyone has ever committed to film.” Inevitable connections have been drawn between his comedic portrayal of Soviet Russia and current political situations domestically and abroad.


‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ is mindless fun that doesn’t take itself too seriously

(03/23/18 4:52am)

Taking place 10 years after the events of the first “Pacific Rim” film, “Pacific Rim: Uprising” follows Jake Pentecost ( John Boyega), son of Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba), who gets pulled back into the military to teach and prepare the new generation of Jaeger pilots, those who command the massive mecha-robots that face the otherworldly monsters. In the event that a new threat emerges, the team would work together to save the planet



'The Death of Stalin' is a deeply dark and delightful satire

(03/16/18 4:14pm)

We live in strange times, don’t we? Where alternative facts are nearly indistinguishable from the truth. Where our leaders do and say things that often leave us scratching our heads. Where our presidential cabinets have become a revolving door of characters. That’s what makes “The Death of Stalin” so wonderfully funny and reflective. Its timeliness reminds us of the humor and absurdity of our present political conditions—and perhaps the horror we see in the face of it.




'Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story' is a sobering documentary long overdue

(03/02/18 5:45pm)

“Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story” tells the tale of World War II inventor and actress  Hedy Lamarr, a tale Lamarr spent years trying to share. Directed by Alexandra Dean, the documentary focuses particularly on Lamarr’s revolutionary invention of frequency hopping, which helped the Allies create a new remote-controlled torpedo. Throughout the years Lamarr never received credit for her work until the end of her life, and never got paid by the U.S. military for her patent. This was because she was seen as just a “pretty face” and an object, but not an illustrious thinker and inventor.


“Death Wish” will leave you wishing just that

(03/02/18 4:47am)

Horror director and producer Eli Roth has had an interesting career spanning two decades. From cult classics like “Cabin Fever” and “Hostel,” as well as an extremely memorable performance as the “Bear Jew” in Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds,” Roth has had both highs and lows, mostly earning a reputation as a niche director who makes gruesome, polarizing films. In a move away from his traditional role as director and producer of violent horror flicks, Roth has decided to undertake a reimagining of the 1974 revenge thriller of the same name, “Death Wish.”


The Eagle’s Guide to the 2018 Academy Award Nominated Short Films

(03/02/18 4:13am)

The Academy Awards this year have a very diverse set of films across all categories, with the short film section being no exception. Here is The Eagle’s guide to the Oscar-nominated shorts broken down by category (“Animated,” “Live-Action” and “Documentary”) and listed in alphabetical order within those categories.


The Eagle's guide to this year's Best Picture nominees

(03/02/18 4:10am)

The months leading up to the 90th Academy Awards have been tumultuous for the film industry. The reckoning Hollywood is facing with many of its prominent male figures as a result of the #MeToo movement has created a unique dynamic this award season. This year has been significant for the viewers and industry insiders as they revealed an underbelly of sexual harassment and abuse.


‘Annihilation’ has its reach exceed its grasp of horror sci-fi

(02/23/18 7:50am)

"Annihilation,” Alex Garland’s much-anticipated follow-up to his smash hit “Ex Machina” is in theaters this weekend. Trailers have teased the film as sci-fi horror with world-ending stakes, a seemingly odd turn from “Ex Machina.” In the end, “Annihilation” is a slow burn sci-fi thriller pondering over gender status, humanity and creation.


Put down the board games and go watch “Game Night”

(02/23/18 7:49am)

It’s probably safe to say that traditions, no matter how celebrated, can become dull after endless repetition. This is the case for the characters in “Game Night,” a film co-directed by the writers of “Horrible Bosses” (Jonathan Goldstein) and more recently “Spider-Man: Homecoming” (both John Francis Daley and Goldstein). When the subjects of the film decide to shake things up a little bit, it drastically backfires, sending the gang into a frenzied adventure when one of their friends is kidnapped.


“Black Panther” is a watershed moment in pop culture

(02/16/18 3:37pm)

Among conversations on contemporary pop culture, there is a consensus: a lack of representation is certainly holding back important stories from being told. Among conversations on cinema, there is a question: if movies are heralded as the universal and accessible art form than for whom are they accessible to? It is clear that we have reached a fever pitch in our society where the demands for equal representation in film is, perhaps finally, being met with real action.


‘Lady Bird’: on class and place

(02/16/18 5:49pm)

“I live on the wrong side of the tracks” says Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson ( Saoirse Ronan) in the movie, “Lady Bird.” At first, the comment seems innocuous, a humorous quip that cements the utter quirkiness of our female protagonist. On a second reading, however, it gives more depth to the film; “Lady Bird” is a movie on place and class more than it is about the mother-daughter dynamic.



A Fantastic Woman is a stunning and vibrant examination into loss

(02/10/18 3:37pm)

LGBTQ films are having a mainstream moment; from “ Moonlight” to “BPM” to “Call Me By Your Name,” recent audiences have been intrigued and delighted by the portrayal of non-hereto norms on the screen. Enter “A Fantastic Woman,” Chile’s official submission to the 2018 Oscars and front-runner for best foreign film. This film is all at once a meditation on identity and sacrifice, discrimination and acceptance and love and loss. Make no mistake: this is not a love story, but in its totality it is a reflection on what it means to suffer a loss in all aspects. A loss of acceptance, of identity, and of a loved one.


Super Bowl LII commercial roundup: Because it’s not all about football, right?

(02/06/18 12:46am)

Sunday night’s Super Bowl LII resulted in a historic win for the Philadelphia Eagles over the New England Patriots, drawing in an audience of over a hundred million viewers across the United States. While the game is a big event for sports fans, many of us look forward to another aspect of the evening -- the commercials. Companies shelled out $5 million dollars -- as a baseline -- for a 30-second ad during this year’s Super Bowl coverage, according to a report by Sports Illustrated. For that amount of money, you would think these commercials would be pretty impressive, right? Some definitely were, while others didn’t quite hit the mark. Here’s a roundup of some of the most talked about Super Bowl ads this year:


Gary Oldman delivers an Oscar-worthy performance in an otherwise unremarkable ‘Darkest Hour’

(12/08/17 7:39am)

Something anomalous has happened in filmmaking recently: Two World War II films released concurrently by different directors happened to contain eerily similar subject matter, and managed to complement one another. These films were “Dunkirk” (Christopher Nolan) and “Darkest Hour” (Joe Wright). “Dunkirk” is a harrowing film chronicling the escape of the surrounded British armed forces from the clutches of the Nazis while “Darkest Hour” serves as a biopic of the man who delivered them from their fates.


‘Tom of Finland’: A solid biopic that lacks focus

(12/08/17 8:39am)

Directed by Dome Karukoski, this Finnish film tells the real-life story of Touko Laaksonen, more famously known as Tom of Finland, one of the most important and influential gay icons of the 20th century. “Tom of Finland” effectively reveals Touko’s inner frustrations and accomplishments, but lacks the flow and emotional heft necessary to pack a bigger punch.