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Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 11/9” reminds us of the importance of documentaries

(09/24/18 3:49pm)

What is the role of the documentarian? Should they maintain a certain distance in their filmmaking or is it their duty to insert themselves in their art and take a stand? Should they let the facts speak for themselves or tell us what to make of the bits and pieces presented? Is documentary filmmaking a form of journalism or simply a glorified Op-ed?


Which movie subscription service is best for college students?

(08/30/18 2:30pm)

The movie theater subscription service MoviePass has been in the news quite a bit recently -- for all the wrong reasons. Amid mounting skepticism as a result of the myriad changes to its business model, CEO Mitch Lowe sent an email to subscribers saying, “MoviePass members will be able to see up to three standard movies a month for $9.95, and be given up to a $5.00 discount to any additional movie tickets purchased.” While still a great deal, this is a far cry from their previous too-good-to-be-true model that allowed subscribers to see as many movies as they wanted for the same low price.


“Support the Girls”: Regina Hall gets by with a little help from her girls

(08/24/18 7:47pm)

“Support the Girls” is a fun, earnest comedy that takes an honest look at a day-in-the-life of the staff of a small-time Texas “breastaurant” and its long-suffering general manager Lisa, played with attention-grabbing sincerity by Regina Hall (“Girls Trip,” the “Scary Movie” series). Over the course of one stressful day, Lisa tries to span the gap between the waitresses she has vowed to take care of and the demands of an unsympathetic business; all while dealing with her own personal crises.


“Love, Cecil” a deep dive into artist who attempted to sculpt extravagance

(07/27/18 2:00pm)

Directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland, “Love, Cecil” is a dive into famous British photographer and designer Cecil Beaton’s diaries. The diaries are incredibly personal, and reveal to us the artist’s suppressed emotions, reflections of his life, the mistakes he’s made, how his childhood formed him and his inspirations for the work that he did. But what makes this documentary more interesting is seeing Cecil’s constant attempts to become part of the elite, and rub shoulders with the most famous and powerful, and how he does it through art.



“Eighth Grade” makes nervous 13-year-olds of us all

(07/20/18 7:35pm)

We often correlate high school to uneasiness and anxiety. Bo Burnham relates it to the frightened thirteen-year-old in us all in “Eighth Grade,” a film about the final week of eighth grade for Kayla Day (Elsie Fisher). She records YouTube videos speaking words of motivation and advice for her next-to-invisible audience but struggles with shyness in day-to-day life and worries about her impending high school social life. Kayla’s father (Josh Hamilton) tries his best to make her feel okay about her situation, usually falling on earbud-filled ears.



“Sorry to Bother You” Is a Creative, Wild, and Zany Movie That Must Be Seen to Believe

(07/07/18 9:36pm)

The season of the summer blockbuster is upon us. That overcrowded action-film-packed time of the year where most movies feel distinctly similar and clichés run amok at cinemas across the country. Gear up for the latest superhero flick, or get ready for another heart throbbing rom-com. Then, there stands “Sorry to Bother You,” a movie that is so crazy and wild, so fresh and new, that it could perhaps provide a cure (if only temporary) to that blockbuster fatigue.



Boots Riley is ‘Sorry To Bother You’ : On his latest movie, the role of the individual and how we’re all just performing

(07/06/18 7:46pm)

The summer, while usually reserved for the blockbuster smashes of superhero action flicks, has found a darling in Boots Riley’s first feature film, “Sorry To Bother You.” The film centers on Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield) as he descends into the seedy underworld of telemarketing while discovering his “white voice.” The film is out now and has been a project of Riley’s for some time: the original script was finished in 2012 and published as its own paperback in 2014. Starting his career as a musician, Riley is used to creating socially conscious pieces of art within various different mediums.



Elvis as a symbol of Americana in “The King”

(06/27/18 9:06pm)

“The King,” directed by Eugene Jarecki and produced by Errol Morris, presents the current state of America through the prism of Elvis Presley, the king of rock n’ roll. It also rationalizes the American definition of success as analogous to the massive rise and tragic fall of Elvis, thus exploring the unhealthy relationship Americans might have with the “American dream”. The documentary follows Presley’s 1963 Rolls Royce across state lines during the 2016 election, inviting people to sit in it and talk not only about what Elvis meant to them, but also about what’s been plaguing them in their daily lives and how they want the country to move forward.


'Tully' is a point blank exploration of the blessings and trials of motherhood

(05/04/18 4:27am)

Motherhood has always been an integral plot element in storytelling. Fantine (Anne Hathaway) is a woman who has to resort to extreme measures to feed her daughter in  “Les Misérables,” and Ellen Page plays a girl who has to reckon with how her life will be different after her teen pregnancy in “Juno.” But often overlooked is the simplicity of the relationship between a mother and her family and how it is in itself is a compelling story story.


'Ghost Stories' is more affecting than scary

(04/27/18 4:48am)

Andy Nyman and Jeremy Dyson direct “Ghost Stories,” a British anthology film starring Nyman as Professor Goodman, a man who dedicates his life to debunking the psychic and the supernatural. The film is an homage to great British anthologies released in the 1960s and 70s by Amicus Productions. Low-budget films like Asylum, From Beyond the Grave and Tales from the Crypt are some of the studio’s notable releases that tell different stories linked by an overarching narrator.



'The Rider' stuns with an honest look into life after injury

(04/20/18 5:50am)

Filmmakers have always glorified men who live life in pursuit of a single goal. From Charles Kane’s final utterance of “Rosebud” in “Citizen Kane” to more recent films like “Whiplash” where the protagonist is dead-set on becoming the greatest drummer to ever live, suffering through endless abuse from his instructor along the way.


‘I Feel Pretty’ teaches us to love (and laugh at) ourselves

(04/20/18 5:45am)

Despite the fact she was not involved in the direction, writing or production of this movie, the role of Renee in “ I Feel Pretty” was made for Amy Schumer. “I Feel Pretty” relays a positive message about self-love in a funny and relatable way. It is not particularly inspiring or empowering, but Schumer’s character shows that confidence is everything.


'Rampage' can’t decide what type of movie it wants to be

(04/13/18 11:11pm)

Based on the popular arcade game of the same name, “Rampage” tells the story of a primatologist named Davis Okoye (Dwayne Johnson), who notices his friend George, who happens to be an albino gorilla, is growing exponentially and getting angrier and angrier because of a mystery serum. The film then sets off with Okoye and Dr. Kate Caldwell (Naomie Harris), who previously worked with the company that created this serum and weapon, attempting to save the world and stop a series of different animals who got infected and are destroying the city.