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The “Hellboy” reboot is bloody but soulless

(04/12/19 2:16am)

As the director of “The Descent” and “Dog Soldiers,” Neil Marshall is no stranger to tackling macabre and unearthly stories. While the “Hellboy” universe seemed like the perfect playground for him, the film is lifeless and falls flat despite the gratuitous amount of blood and gore and David Harbour’s solid performance as the titular character. 


Director Mike Leigh discusses his latest historical drama “Peterloo”

(04/05/19 1:46pm)

In August of 1819, 80,000 people rallied together at St. Peter’s Field, Manchester, in order to seek representation and reform. The peaceful demonstration soon turned into a frenzy, when the cavalry were ordered to enter and disrupt the people. This devolved into a violent massacre that led to hundreds of injuries and some deaths. 



Jordan Peele’s “Us” is an ambitious and chilling fable of American identity

(03/22/19 2:23pm)

Jordan Peele shattered expectations with his directorial debut “Get Out.” Not only did it tap into the zeitgeist, but it also provided a darkly humorous and equally scary take on American race relations. In his sophomore effort, “Us,” he expands the lens of his commentary by exploring recurring conflicts within American identity.


“How To Train Your Dragon 3” is an epic and emotional end to the animated trilogy

(02/22/19 11:52am)

The original “How To Train Your Dragon” made huge waves when it premiered in 2010. Not only was it visually stunning, it was also emotional and action-packed, setting the bar high for its sequels. How To Train Your Dragon 3: The Hidden World marks the conclusion of Toothless and Hiccup’s (Jay Baruchel) story and it does not disappoint, boasting quality animation, fantastic flying setpieces and a strong emotional core.



“Creed II” isn’t as graceful as it’s predecessor, but still throws impressive punches

(11/20/18 6:14pm)

Directed by Steven Caple Jr, “Creed II” ties the new franchise closer to the “Rocky” series, summoning a sequel that’s tied closely to the events of the fourth “Rocky” film. In this latest installment, Adonis Creed (Michael B. Jordan) is challenged by Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren) and his son (Florian Munteanu) to a boxing match, a fight that carries an incredible amount of baggage, for both Creed and Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone).


Jason Reitman’s “The Frontrunner” is well made, but lacks punch and personality

(11/15/18 6:31pm)

Jason Reitman’s latest film tells the true story of Senator Gary Hart (Hugh Jackman), who was embroiled in a controversy regarding an extramarital affair while running for the Presidency in 1988. The film covers the three weeks from when the information reaches the press, to when he eventually drops out of the race. “The Frontrunner” however never has anything to say, and just lets the story unfold without ever divulging anything interesting.


‘The Great Buster: A Celebration’ is a Bogdanovich love letter to comedy icon Buster Keaton

(11/09/18 4:42pm)

Even if one hasn’t seen Buster Keaton’s films, they are sure to have seen one of the many gags he created in other iconic films and television. Buster Keaton was not only an incredibly comedic performer, but also a filmmaking pioneer. In this entertaining tribute, Director Peter Bogdanovich shows just how his comedy bits and setpieces, especially in the 1920s, kept pushing the boundaries of what could be possible on the silver screen.


“A Private War” is a thoughtful, visceral look at journalist Marie Colvin’s experiences

(11/08/18 2:01pm)

It is hard to quantify the true face of war. Everyday, people look at the news and hear stories about mass deaths, violence and acts of pure evil in different war-torn countries, where ordinary people have become victims ─ victims who need to have their stories told. Most are lucky to have a safe detachment from these warring corners of the world, but some brave few are tasked to bring those stories back home, who feel compelled to inform the public about these injustices. Marie Colvin was one of those people.


“The Other Side of the Wind” is a challenging, unwieldy view into the director

(11/01/18 2:00pm)

“The Other Side of the Wind” had a long journey before it made its way to screens. It was Orson Welles’ final outing as a director before he passed. He spent years trying to get funding to finish this film. Welles, by the 1980s, had garnered an enormous amount of respect, but that didn’t mean people were willing to sign on to something that was experimental. Welles was a man who was emboldened by his eccentricities, especially in the tail end of his career. When he passed in 1985, hours of shot footage were forgotten for years. This made Frank Marshall and Peter Bogdanovich (who also stars as Brooks Otterlake) spend years trying to get the movie off the ground again.


Michael Myers returns to Haddonfield in this serviceable, unsatisfying “Halloween”

(10/18/18 9:53pm)

Director David Gordon Green and writer Danny McBride have an interesting take on the “Halloween” franchise. 40 years after the original, Michael has been locked up in an institution this whole time, while Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) lives as a recluse, alienated by her family for her paranoia. The sequels following the original are retconned, and all that’s left is the memory of that fateful night 40 years ago, when the senseless, grizzly murders occured.


“Love, Cecil” a deep dive into artist who attempted to sculpt extravagance

(07/27/18 2:00pm)

Directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland, “Love, Cecil” is a dive into famous British photographer and designer Cecil Beaton’s diaries. The diaries are incredibly personal, and reveal to us the artist’s suppressed emotions, reflections of his life, the mistakes he’s made, how his childhood formed him and his inspirations for the work that he did. But what makes this documentary more interesting is seeing Cecil’s constant attempts to become part of the elite, and rub shoulders with the most famous and powerful, and how he does it through art.


Elvis as a symbol of Americana in “The King”

(06/27/18 9:06pm)

“The King,” directed by Eugene Jarecki and produced by Errol Morris, presents the current state of America through the prism of Elvis Presley, the king of rock n’ roll. It also rationalizes the American definition of success as analogous to the massive rise and tragic fall of Elvis, thus exploring the unhealthy relationship Americans might have with the “American dream”. The documentary follows Presley’s 1963 Rolls Royce across state lines during the 2016 election, inviting people to sit in it and talk not only about what Elvis meant to them, but also about what’s been plaguing them in their daily lives and how they want the country to move forward.


'Ghost Stories' is more affecting than scary

(04/27/18 4:48am)

Andy Nyman and Jeremy Dyson direct “Ghost Stories,” a British anthology film starring Nyman as Professor Goodman, a man who dedicates his life to debunking the psychic and the supernatural. The film is an homage to great British anthologies released in the 1960s and 70s by Amicus Productions. Low-budget films like Asylum, From Beyond the Grave and Tales from the Crypt are some of the studio’s notable releases that tell different stories linked by an overarching narrator.


'Rampage' can’t decide what type of movie it wants to be

(04/13/18 11:11pm)

Based on the popular arcade game of the same name, “Rampage” tells the story of a primatologist named Davis Okoye (Dwayne Johnson), who notices his friend George, who happens to be an albino gorilla, is growing exponentially and getting angrier and angrier because of a mystery serum. The film then sets off with Okoye and Dr. Kate Caldwell (Naomie Harris), who previously worked with the company that created this serum and weapon, attempting to save the world and stop a series of different animals who got infected and are destroying the city.  



'Aardvark’ is a sporadically interesting but ultimately dull drama

(04/13/18 9:05am)

“Aardvark” tells the story of Josh Norman (Zachary Quinto), as he starts to see his therapist Emily (Jenny Slate) again after finding out his brother, Craig (Jon Hamm) is back in town for the first time in 16 years. Josh starts to reveal to Emily that he’s seen his brother on many occasions, masquerading as different people in his life. What Josh doesn’t know is that Emily is dating his brother.



‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ is mindless fun that doesn’t take itself too seriously

(03/23/18 4:52am)

Taking place 10 years after the events of the first “Pacific Rim” film, “Pacific Rim: Uprising” follows Jake Pentecost ( John Boyega), son of Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba), who gets pulled back into the military to teach and prepare the new generation of Jaeger pilots, those who command the massive mecha-robots that face the otherworldly monsters. In the event that a new threat emerges, the team would work together to save the planet