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Silver Screen


Discover a messy Wall Street scandal in 'The China Hustle'

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 03/30/18 3:48pm

The world was profoundly affected by the stock market crash of 2008, and Americans are still feeling the consequences. However, since 2008, Chinese markets have appeared to be unaffected and even improving in some cases. Documentary filmmaker Jed Rothstein’s “The China Hustle” explores a loophole that may have allowed Chinese companies to exploit world markets. While it has a riveting premise, the documentary falls into the same trap from which many economic and Wall Street-centric films ...

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Comedy from the Truth: Armando Iannucci on the current state of satire and his latest film 'The Death of Stalin'

By Jacob Robbins Last updated: 03/23/18 6:27pm

Director and British Statist Armando Iannucci finds himself in a weird predicament. His latest film “The Death of Stalin” has been a sensational critical hit, with The New Yorker magazine heralding it as “the most accurate picture of life under Soviet terror that anyone has ever committed to film.” Inevitable connections have been drawn between his comedic portrayal of Soviet Russia and current political situations domestically and abroad. The problem? He started work on the film two ...

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‘Pacific Rim: Uprising’ is mindless fun that doesn’t take itself too seriously

By Ali Almutairi Last updated: 03/23/18 4:52am

Taking place 10 years after the events of the first “Pacific Rim” film, “Pacific Rim: Uprising” follows Jake Pentecost ( John Boyega), son of Stacker Pentecost (Idris Elba), who gets pulled back into the military to teach and prepare the new generation of Jaeger pilots, those who command the massive mecha-robots that face the otherworldly monsters. In the event that a new threat emerges, the team would work together to save the planet Director Steven S. DeKnight (“Spartacus” and ...

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‘Ramen Heads’ is an enjoyable jaunt targeted at a niche fanbase

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 03/23/18 4:50am

People often take for granted things that are a part of their everyday lives and ignore their meaningful origins in lieu of more pressing details like jobs and family. “Ramen Heads,” named after the group of die-hard foodies that make ramen a cornerstone of their lives, is the first film from TV documentary director Koki Shigeno. It delves into an important aspect of everyday life in Japan that may get overlooked: ramen. The first 40 minutes of the documentary act as a biographical introduction ...

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'The Death of Stalin' is a deeply dark and delightful satire

By Jacob Robbins Last updated: 03/16/18 4:14pm

We live in strange times, don’t we? Where alternative facts are nearly indistinguishable from the truth. Where our leaders do and say things that often leave us scratching our heads. Where our presidential cabinets have become a revolving door of characters. That’s what makes “The Death of Stalin” so wonderfully funny and reflective. Its timeliness reminds us of the humor and absurdity of our present political conditions—and perhaps the horror we see in the face of it. The latest ...

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Intentional or not, “Leaning into the Wind: Andy Goldsworthy” is a great bedtime watch

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 03/16/18 3:04pm

In a world full of videos of crackling fireplaces, crickets chirping and ethereal soundtracks played over a night sky, viewers and listeners have plenty of resources for finding sleep aids online. However, these videos usually have no substantial purpose besides lulling the listener to sleep. In creating a documentary about the sculptor Andy Goldsworthy, director and cinematographer Thomas Riedelsheimer has managed to achieve a middle ground between an engaging artist profile and a sleep-inducing, ...

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The best Oscar-winning movies you probably forgot about

By Jacob Robbins Last updated: 03/05/18 9:27pm

It’s those five words that have us on the edge of our seats every year: “and the Oscar goes to…” We await in gleeful anticipation for who will carry that golden statuette. Will it be a surprise? Will it finally be someone who should’ve gotten it three movies ago? Will it be the newcomer? The hype for these moments reach massive levels of excitement, yet after those five words are uttered, after the acceptance speech, after either the vows to see the awarded performance or cries ...

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'Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story' is a sobering documentary long overdue

By Ali Almutairi Last updated: 03/02/18 5:45pm

“Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story” tells the tale of World War II inventor and actress  Hedy Lamarr, a tale Lamarr spent years trying to share. Directed by Alexandra Dean, the documentary focuses particularly on Lamarr’s revolutionary invention of frequency hopping, which helped the Allies create a new remote-controlled torpedo. Throughout the years Lamarr never received credit for her work until the end of her life, and never got paid by the U.S. military for her patent. This was because ...

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“Death Wish” will leave you wishing just that

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 03/02/18 4:47am

Horror director and producer Eli Roth has had an interesting career spanning two decades. From cult classics like “Cabin Fever” and “Hostel,” as well as an extremely memorable performance as the “Bear Jew” in Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds,” Roth has had both highs and lows, mostly earning a reputation as a niche director who makes gruesome, polarizing films. In a move away from his traditional role as director and producer of violent horror flicks, Roth has decided ...

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The Eagle’s Guide to the 2018 Academy Award Nominated Short Films

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 03/02/18 4:13am

The Academy Awards this year have a very diverse set of films across all categories, with the short film section being no exception. Here is The Eagle’s guide to the Oscar-nominated shorts broken down by category (“Animated,” “Live-Action” and “Documentary”) and listed in alphabetical order within those categories. Animated “Achoo” In this charming short, a runtish dragon competes with two of his larger, stronger and more talented peers in a competition to impress a human ...

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The Eagle's guide to this year's Best Picture nominees

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 03/02/18 4:10am

An outstanding year in filmmaking has resulted in no clear front-runner. The months leading up to the 90th Academy Awards have been tumultuous for the film industry. The reckoning Hollywood is facing with many of its prominent male figures as a result of the #MeToo movement has created a unique dynamic this award season. This year has been significant for the viewers and industry insiders as they revealed an underbelly of sexual harassment and abuse. Films such as “The Post” and “Dunkirk” ...

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‘Annihilation’ has its reach exceed its grasp of horror sci-fi

By Dilpreet Raju Last updated: 02/23/18 7:50am

"Annihilation,” Alex Garland’s much-anticipated follow-up to his smash hit “Ex Machina” is in theaters this weekend. Trailers have teased the film as sci-fi horror with world-ending stakes, a seemingly odd turn from “Ex Machina.” In the end, “Annihilation” is a slow burn sci-fi thriller pondering over gender status, humanity and creation. Aside from the hype around Garland’s second time in the director’s chair, the film has garnered some press for its release structure ...

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Put down the board games and go watch “Game Night”

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 02/23/18 7:49am

It’s probably safe to say that traditions, no matter how celebrated, can become dull after endless repetition. This is the case for the characters in “Game Night,” a film co-directed by the writers of “Horrible Bosses” (Jonathan Goldstein) and more recently “Spider-Man: Homecoming” (both John Francis Daley and Goldstein). When the subjects of the film decide to shake things up a little bit, it drastically backfires, sending the gang into a frenzied adventure when one of their friends ...

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‘Lady Bird’: on class and place

By Jacob Robbins Last updated: 02/16/18 5:49pm

“I live on the wrong side of the tracks” says Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson ( Saoirse Ronan) in the movie, “Lady Bird.” At first, the comment seems innocuous, a humorous quip that cements the utter quirkiness of our female protagonist. On a second reading, however, it gives more depth to the film; “Lady Bird” is a movie on place and class more than it is about the mother-daughter dynamic. Much has been made in the flashy advertisements on television and social media about “Lady ...

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“Black Panther” is a watershed moment in pop culture

By Jacob Robbins Last updated: 02/16/18 3:37pm

Among conversations on contemporary pop culture, there is a consensus: a lack of representation is certainly holding back important stories from being told. Among conversations on cinema, there is a question: if movies are heralded as the universal and accessible art form than for whom are they accessible to? It is clear that we have reached a fever pitch in our society where the demands for equal representation in film is, perhaps finally, being met with real action. It is not an exaggeration ...

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Top 10 shows to help you relax and de-stress this semester

By Grace George Last updated: 02/15/18 4:20am

In order to maintain sanity between exams and homework, it is essential to take breaks from studying any way you can. Whether you are looking for a laugh or a good mystery, here are a few shows to watch when you want to destress and forget anything that might be weighing you down. “The Office” “The Office” is a classic TV series that will make you laugh at every awkward turn. All nine seasons of this raunchy, easy-to-follow comedy are available on Netflix and no matter how far the characters ...

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A Fantastic Woman is a stunning and vibrant examination into loss

By Jacob Robbins Last updated: 02/10/18 3:37pm

LGBTQ films are having a mainstream moment; from “ Moonlight” to “BPM” to “Call Me By Your Name,” recent audiences have been intrigued and delighted by the portrayal of non-hereto norms on the screen. Enter “A Fantastic Woman,” Chile’s official submission to the 2018 Oscars and front-runner for best foreign film. This film is all at once a meditation on identity and sacrifice, discrimination and acceptance and love and loss. Make no mistake: this is not a love story, but in ...

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Super Bowl LII commercial roundup: Because it’s not all about football, right?

By Anna Donohue Last updated: 02/06/18 12:46am

Sunday night’s Super Bowl LII resulted in a historic win for the Philadelphia Eagles over the New England Patriots, drawing in an audience of over a hundred million viewers across the United States. While the game is a big event for sports fans, many of us look forward to another aspect of the evening -- the commercials. Companies shelled out $5 million dollars -- as a baseline -- for a 30-second ad during this year’s Super Bowl coverage, according to a report by Sports Illustrated. For ...

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‘The Shape of Water’ is a human love story between a woman and an amphibian

By Becky Evans Last updated: 12/08/17 9:39am

Guillermo del Toro loves creatures. From the Pale Man in “Pan’s Labyrinth” to the titular character of “Hellboy,” his films have become famous for their inhuman characters. Now, del Toro thinks it is time to give some love back to his creatures. “The Shape of Water” is del Toro’s newest film. It chronicles the star-crossed romance between Elisa (Sally Hawkins), a strong-willed mute woman who works as a cleaner in an underground government lab, and the strange humanoid amphibian ...

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‘Tom of Finland’: A solid biopic that lacks focus

By Ali Almutairi Last updated: 12/08/17 8:39am

Directed by Dome Karukoski, this Finnish film tells the real-life story of Touko Laaksonen, more famously known as Tom of Finland, one of the most important and influential gay icons of the 20th century. “Tom of Finland” effectively reveals Touko’s inner frustrations and accomplishments, but lacks the flow and emotional heft necessary to pack a bigger punch. Touko Laaksonen was an artist who drew “homoerotic fetish art” in the latter half of the 20th century, and many of his works became ...

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