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Silver Screen


‘The Shape of Water’ is a human love story between a woman and an amphibian

By Becky Evans Last updated: 12/08/17 4:39am

Guillermo del Toro loves creatures. From the Pale Man in “Pan’s Labyrinth” to the titular character of “Hellboy,” his films have become famous for their inhuman characters. Now, del Toro thinks it is time to give some love back to his creatures. “The Shape of Water” is del Toro’s newest film. It chronicles the star-crossed romance between Elisa (Sally Hawkins), a strong-willed mute woman who works as a cleaner in an underground government lab, and the strange humanoid amphibian ...

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‘Tom of Finland’: A solid biopic that lacks focus

By Ali Almutairi Last updated: 12/08/17 3:39am

Directed by Dome Karukoski, this Finnish film tells the real-life story of Touko Laaksonen, more famously known as Tom of Finland, one of the most important and influential gay icons of the 20th century. “Tom of Finland” effectively reveals Touko’s inner frustrations and accomplishments, but lacks the flow and emotional heft necessary to pack a bigger punch. Touko Laaksonen was an artist who drew “homoerotic fetish art” in the latter half of the 20th century, and many of his works became ...

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Gary Oldman delivers an Oscar-worthy performance in an otherwise unremarkable ‘Darkest Hour’

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 12/08/17 2:39am

Something anomalous has happened in filmmaking recently: Two World War II films released concurrently by different directors happened to contain eerily similar subject matter, and managed to complement one another. These films were “Dunkirk” (Christopher Nolan) and “Darkest Hour” (Joe Wright). “Dunkirk” is a harrowing film chronicling the escape of the surrounded British armed forces from the clutches of the Nazis while “Darkest Hour” serves as a biopic of the man who delivered ...

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'The Divine Order' is a charming feminist manifesto

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 12/01/17 1:52am

“In 1971, the world was changing…but here at home, time stood still.” These are the words that open “The Divine Order,” hinting at the world the viewer is stepping into; a world still full of sexism and inequality. Despite the film’s familiar story arc, it is complemented by a dynamic cast, a brisk pace, and impeccable comedic timing that make it one of a kind. After the introduction, which was laced with footage from ‘60s and ‘70s social movements, the viewer is brought ...

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'Roman J. Israel, Esq.' proves Denzel Washington isn’t slowing down anytime soon

By Ali Almutairi Last updated: 11/30/17 1:55pm

From Nightcrawler director Dan Gilroy comes “Roman J. Israel, Esq.” Denzel Washington stars as a former civil rights lawyer who is in a state of personal crisis. He slowly realizes that the world is not the same as it was when he was young, and that the legal system still does not favor or always help the less fortunate. These brewing thoughts paired with his internal struggle makes the film an effective and enjoyable critique against modern legal institutions, but people may be turned off ...

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Pixar’s ‘Coco’ is a cultural adventure with many twists and turns, but ultimately finds its way to your heart

By Cordilia James Last updated: 11/22/17 12:23am

There are three key elements that come to mind when I think of Pixar movies: creativity, adventure and emotion. Despite minor setbacks, the latest Pixar movie, “ Coco” manages to tackle each element brilliantly, making it a film the whole family can enjoy. The animated film follows the story of Miguel Rivera ( Anthony Gonzalez), a young Mexican boy with dreams of becoming a musician amidst his music-loathing family. Their hatred of music began generations earlier when Miguel’s ...

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'Coco' writer and story supervisor aims to tell a story of Mexican culture the right way

By CORDILIA JAMES/THE EAGLE Last updated: 11/21/17 4:40pm

Back in 2011, after the “Toy Story 3” craze had finally started to settle, Pixar Story Supervisor Jason Katz teamed up with Director Lee Unkrich to brainstorm story ideas for a new world audiences everywhere could enjoy.Both men found themselves fascinated by Mexican culture. Katz in particular had an affinity for Mexican folk art, collecting alebrijes and books on the subject. At last the two came up with the story of a young boy who travels to the “Land of the Dead,” where he learns about ...

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“120 BPM” shows the French ACT UP movement as sex, pain, death, dancing

By Michael Valenti Last updated: 11/20/17 4:43pm

120 Battement Par Minute (Beats Per Minute) is director Robin Campillo’s second major film. The two and a half hour movie discusses many aspects of the French AIDS epidemic in the 1990s through a mostly historical fiction lens with some real documentary found footage. Campillo seems to define the afflicted gay community through an on-screen combination of sex, death, dancing and group solidarity. Even if there is disagreement among the more extreme members of ACT UP, the AIDS awareness group ...

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‘The Room’ star, Jacob Tremblay, does it again with ‘Wonder’

By Leanna Faulk Last updated: 11/18/17 6:01pm

Based on the New York Times bestseller, “Wonder” tells the beautiful story of August “Auggie” Pullman, a 10-year-old boy with an extremely rare facial deformity, attending school for the first time after being homeschooled by his mother all of his life. The film is heart-warming and inspiring -- especially school-aged students. ‘Wonder’ has the capability to really spark change amongst families with children living with facial deformities. Its emotional and honest depictions of love, ...

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‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ is a masterful tale of grief and redemption

By Brandon Ermer Last updated: 11/17/17 6:14am

In his 2008 cult hit “In Bruges,” writer and director Martin McDonagh depicts two hitmen out on a contract in Bruges, Belgium. While the film never strays far from the macabre inevitability that someone is going to be murdered, the relationship between the two hitmen is akin to that of an old married couple trying to salvage their marriage by taking a vacation. McDonagh takes this formula, combining morbidness and hilarity, and expands on it in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” ...

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