Delivering American University's news and views since 1925. | Tuesday, July 17, 2018

AU alumna Sarah McBride speaks at DNC

Former SG president is first openly transgender person to speak at a major party convention

AU alumna Sarah McBride speaks at DNC

Photo Credit: Courtney Rozen/ THE EAGLE

Former Student Government president Sarah McBride is used to “firsts”, but her most recent one made national news. Last night, McBride became the first openly transgender person to speak at a national convention.

McBride spoke on the fourth and final day of the convention, where she was introduced by Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, the first openly gay representative to be elected from New York state. She told the audience about her journey of coming out, her current activism for LGBT equality and her endorsement of Hillary Clinton for president.

“My name is Sarah McBride, and I am a proud transgender American,” McBride said in her speech. “Four years ago, I came out as transgender while serving as student body president in college. At the time, I was scared. I worried that my dreams and my identity were mutually exclusive. Since then though I’ve seen that change is possible."

McBride came out as transgender soon after finishing her position as SG president in 2012, writing about her journey in an op-ed in The Eagle. McBride went on to become the first transgender intern in the White House, and graduated from SPA in 2013.

In addition to discussing politics in her speech, McBride paid tribute to her deceased husband Andrew Cray, who died from cancer in 2014. Cray, a transgender man, passed away four days after their wedding day.

Near the end of her address, McBride endorsed Clinton for president, stating that Clinton best understood the importance of the Equality Act, fighting violence against transgender women of color and ending the HIV and AIDS epidemic. The fight for the Equality Act, a law designed to protect LGBT individuals from discrimination, is personal for McBride, as she has been working towards its passage for much of her career as an LGBT activist, she told the Eagle in October.


“Today in America, LGBTQ people are targeted by hate that lives in both laws and hearts,” McBride said in her speech. “Many still struggle just to get by. But I believe tomorrow can be different. Tomorrow, we can be respected and protected. Especially if Hillary Clinton is our president. And that’s why I’m proud to say that I’m with her.”

zewell@theeagleonline.com


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